Tagged: Stats

Gashouse Gorillas of Division III?

Newbury College and Bridgewater State got together for a Division III baseball game this past Monday at Bridgewater’s home field.

The two teams combined for 58 runs.

The home team scored 57 of those runs.

http://www.bridgew.edu/athletics/DIRECT/Stats/baseball2007_stats/bscbb14.htm

Yes, just your old-fashioned 57-1 thumping.

Bridgewater scored at least 8 runs in each of its first five times at-bat.

Three different Bridgewater players drove in at least 7 runs.

During one four-inning stretch, Bridgewater sent 64 men to the plate, and 52 reached base.

Bridgewater was the recipient of 20 walks and 4 HBPs.

Newbury had eight men reach base during the game … Bridgewater had one inning in which fewer than eight reached base.

ERAs for the Newbury pitchers:

Anthony DiClemente 0.0 IP (7 batters faced), 7  ER, ERA: Infinity
William Maddock 1.0 IP, 5 ER, ERA: 45.00
Jamison Torres 2.0 IP, 19 ER, ERA: 85.50
Homas Mathew 2.0 IP, 11  ER, ERA: 49.50
Brian Fish 1.0  IP, 2  ER, ERA: 18.00

Attendance was listed at 50 … they each received the gift of a run named after them. 🙂

(My thanks to buddy Richard Senzel for the heads-up on this one)

Did Ensberg REALLY gain more patience at the plate?

As part of ESPN’s Fantasy Baseball Draft Kit, Guy Lake (part of the "Talented Mr. Roto" team) advised on the draftability of certain players who were injured during 2006 (see below)

ESPN baseball injury update for 2007

One comment about the Astros’ Morgan Ensberg made me sit up and take notice (emphasis mine).

======================
"Ensberg suffered through a horrible year after injuring his shoulder
diving for a foul ball. Note that despite the injury Ensberg actually
improved his plate patience (101 walks) from 2005 (85) in 13 fewer games
."

======================

Now, if you were battling a shoulder injury, wouldn’t you want to limit the number of pitches you actually swung at … be more selective as a way of protecting against tweaking the shoulder again? 

Ensberg’s walk rate actually started to skyrocket in 2005 (perhaps not-so-coincidentally, his first season of 500+ plate appearances),  His number of pitches per plate appearance took off then too, which also leads to his higher K rate:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year PA BB BB% K K% #P/PA
2003 441 48 11% 60 14% 3.70
2004 456 36 8% 46 10% 3.56
2005 624 85 14% 119 19% 3.94

Let’s look at 2006, before the shoulder injury on June 9, during his fight to play through it (6/10-7/9), and then his return from the inevitable DL stint and rehab (8/1-9/29).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PA AB H 2B 3B HR BB K BA OBP SLG BB% K%
4/3-6/9 266 219 56 11 1 18 44 54 .256 .380 .562 17% 20%
6/10-7/9 83 57 9 3 0 1 24 16 .158 .422 .263 29% 19%
8/1-9/29 146 111 26 3 0 4 33 26 .234 .411 .369 23% 18%
tot 495 387 91 17 1 23 101 96 .235 .396 .463 20% 19%

I don’t have number of pitches per plate appearance for these three sections, but for the year, he saw an average of 4.23 pitches per PA.  Here are the rates by month:

April 4.27

May 4.18

June 4.28

July 4.14

Aug 4.11

Sept 4.46

Interestingly, he was at his MOST patient during September, when he was supposedly fully healed, and the Astros needed his bat in the race for the division.  He wasn’t swinging at more/bad pitches (his K rate being consistent throughout the year), he was just more selective.

(For comparison sake, of those with enough PAs for the batting title, only 7 players saw a higher average of pitches per PA, and they are the typical names of patience and OBP: Giambi, Nick Johnson, Frank Thomas, Abreu, Burrell, Youkilis and Thome.)

He started the season on a torrid homerun pace, and though his BA slipped, he improved on his 2005 BB rate.  The month in which he fought through the injury saw him walk roughly 3 out of every 10 PAs, a Bondsian rate.  Upon his return, his XBH power didn’t come back at anywhere near 100%, but his walk rate was still at a career high.

So … this may in fact be the growth in one aspect of Ensberg’s "skill set", but 2006’s BB rate needs to be seen in a certain perspective. 

We’ll see what the addition of Carlos Lee does for the continuance of this positive trend.

A-Rod’s clutchness … episode 5,364

In the never-ending dissection of A-Rod’s "clutchness," here is yet another look.

I took the players who amassed a minimum of 500 PAs with 2 outs and runners in scoring position since the beginning of the 2000 season (44 names), and compared their average to all other situations.  I expressed the difference between the two averages not in terms of raw b.a. difference (.300 – .250 = .050), but in terms of one’s percentage of the others (.300/.250 =  +20%).  This allows for a fairer baseline comparison of who boosts their individual baseline performance in clutch situations.

Here are the results:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  ALL
  OTHER
2 OUT /
  RISP
 
Player AB H BA AB H BA diff
Garret Anderson 3600 1049 .291 555 174 .314 7.8%
Manny Ramirez 3100 986 .318 444 148 .333 4.7%
Jeromy Burnitz 3065 750 .245 462 117 .253 3.4%
Derek Jeter 3811 1202 .315 442 141 .319 1.1%
Bobby Abreu 3639 1089 .299 384 116 .302 0.9%
Richie Sexson 3123 840 .269 428 116 .271 0.8%
Jeff Kent 3376 1022 .303 446 135 .303 0.1%
Torii Hunter 2983 807 .271 508 137 .270 -0.2%
Joe Randa 3026 851 .281 464 130 .280 -0.4%
Brian Giles 3486 1029 .295 396 116 .293 -0.7%
Bernie Williams 3165 914 .289 435 124 .285 -1.3%
Lance Berkman 3199 979 .306 395 119 .301 -1.6%
Vladimir Guerrero 3550 1170 .330 367 118 .322 -2.3%
Pat Burrell 3030 786 .259 497 125 .252 -2.9%
Vinny Castilla 2842 721 .254 464 114 .246 -3.0%
Craig Biggio 3557 955 .268 413 107 .259 -3.5%
Rafael Palmeiro 2789 757 .271 402 105 .261 -3.8%
Troy Glaus 2914 754 .259 410 101 .246 -4.9%
Miguel Tejada 3945 1179 .299 537 151 .281 -6.0%
Preston Wilson 2944 783 .266 462 115 .249 -6.4%
Adrian Beltre 3482 958 .275 470 121 .257 -6.6%
Rafael Furcal 3477 1003 .288 435 117 .269 -6.7%
Jimmy Rollins 3585 989 .276 412 106 .257 -6.8%
Carlos Delgado 3294 970 .294 427 117 .274 -7.0%
Scott Rolen 2900 842 .290 493 133 .270 -7.0%
Mike Lowell 3313 921 .278 506 129 .255 -8.3%
Carlos Lee 3586 1034 .288 492 130 .264 -8.4%
Alex Rodriguez 3745 1150 .307 450 126 .280 -8.8%
Magglio Ordonez 3051 955 .313 426 120 .282 -9.9%
Jim Thome 2908 818 .281 424 105 .248 -11.8%
Edgar Renteria 3502 1033 .295 491 126 .257 -12.9%
Steve Finley 3078 841 .273 437 104 .238 -12.9%
Orlando Cabrera 3535 969 .274 467 111 .238 -13.2%
David Bell 2913 762 .262 454 103 .227 -13.2%
Jorge Posada 2891 811 .281 478 115 .241 -14.1%
Shawn Green 3654 1041 .285 469 114 .243 -14.7%
Jeff Conine 2877 838 .291 429 106 .247 -15.2%
Eric Chavez 3374 939 .278 437 102 .233 -16.3%
Paul Konerko 3328 973 .292 496 120 .242 -17.2%
Johnny Damon 3913 1168 .298 455 110 .242 -18.9%
Andruw Jones 3589 993 .277 568 127 .224 -19.0%
Derrek Lee 3126 918 .294 406 94 .232 -21.0%
Jim Edmonds 2863 848 .296 400 93 .233 -21.3%
Jermaine Dye 3076 882 .287 433 97 .224 -21.9%

Garrett Anderson improves his batting average by about 8% in clutch situations, while Jermaine Dye may need a pinch-hitter in the clutch, losing nearly 22% off his "normal" BA.

A-Rod DOES lose a bit of his edge in these situations …. but he’s far from a slouch.

Rays tragic number is 5

Loyal readers may remember my June 2005 post regarding the history of large team home/road winning percentage disparities …

The last iteration of the home/road splitsville discussion

Well, with 6 games to go, your 2006 Tampa Bay Devil Rays have a shot at becoming the first team in over 60 years to play at least .500 ball at home while playing UNDER .250 ball on the road.

The others … (with home and road records respectively)

Team Year GM W L Win%      Team Year GM W L Win% diff.
PHA    1945 77 39 35 .527       PHA 1945 76 13 63 .171 .356
BLA   1902 64 32 30 .516        BLA 1902 77 18 57 .240 .276

Tampa has finished its home games for the year, going 41-40 (.506).  They currently sit at 19-56 (.253) on the road, with 3 games in Boston and 3 in Cleveland to end the season.  If they can lose 5 of those 6 games, they will finish 20-61 (.247) on the road.

The stats geek in me is rooting for 5 losses …

Giants new version of “Dirty Dozen”

With tonight’s 10-8 loss to Milwaukee, the Giants have now given up a remarkable 113 runs over their past 12 games, while scoring 73.  (They’ve actually been able to win 3 of those games, including a shutout).  When is the last time a team has given up that many runs over a 12-game stretch? 

Tm   StartDate      EndDate      Games    W-L   RS     RA

—+—–+———–+———–+———–+———————–
CHC 1999-06-20  1999-07-03    66-77     4-8     81    130

(The pre-humidor Rockies gave up at least 113 runs over a 12-game stretch on numerous occasions, but the Cubs allowed the MOST runs over a 12-game stretch in recent history.  Three of those 12 Cub games DID take place at Coors.  The Giants played 3 of their games at Coors during their current streak.)

Now, if you exclude ANY games involving Coors Field, you have to go all the way back to 1977 to find a worse 12-game stretch for runs allowed ….

Tm    StartDate     EndDate       Games    W-L    RS   RA
—+—–+———–+———–+———–+———————-
ATL 1977-04-24   1977-05-07    15-26     0-12    37  114